HOME Air Raid Shelters Index      

 

JONES & ATTWOOD

These tunnels were dug in 1939 under Air Raid Precaution (ARP) directives issued by Stourbridge Borough Council. The tunnels were leased to J & A by the Council, who owned the Memorial Sports Ground above the tunnels, for a period of 25 years at a rent of one shilling per year. At the end of the lease in 1964 the entrances were bricked up thus sealing the tunnels.

Some 40 years later, the tunnels were opened up for a couple of days for this study to take place, and then resealed.

Plan1

Plan2

 

LEGEND

Dimensions (in feet)

A

B

C

D

E

F

29.5

45

83.5

43

60

72

G

H

I

J

K

L

56

54

7.5

12

38

11

M

N

O

P

Q

R

25

36

22.5

39

34

14

S

T

U

V

W

X

48

19

30

125

93

MINOR         ROOF         FALLS

Toilets
Cubicles were about 24 inches wide by about 36 inches deep – no doors. The toilets were of galvanised steel, a perforated outer skin, which would have contained de-odourising chemicals, with an inner ‘bucket’, a steel ring to seal the gap between inner and outer layers, and a wooden seat. These were found scattered in the tunnels.
Seats
58 alcoves were cut parallel to the tunnels, 6 to 8 feet long and some 26 inches deep, with the seats being about 16 inches wide and about 16 inches high. This allowed those sheltering to be seated without their legs obstructing the tunnels. There is evidence that the seats had wooden backs and sitting surface, which would have been more pleasant than sitting on the damp sandstone. Well over 200 people could have been seated in this shelter, members of the public had right of admittance during an air raid.
Tunnels
The main tunnels were about 42 inches wide and 80 inches high, whilst those with the toilets were only about 27 inches wide. All tunnels were illuminated by electric lighting along the centre of the roof. The conduit carrying the electricity wires was painted white, and white lines could be seen along most of the tunnel roofs. A number of clips, which held the conduit, were also seen in the roof. An electrical fuse box was found built into the brickwork just inside entrance one, and a piece of conduit, with wires still inside was seen protruding from the sandstone above the external brick archway of entrance one.
First aid post
%his was the only point where a water supply was noticed, and extra lighting seams to have been provided.